meloromantics:

hotdadcalendar:

Do you ever straight up forget that you’re not in high school anymore and you’re like SHIT I HAVEN’T GONE TO CLASS IN THREE YEARS and then you remember

my boyfriend, his father, and his GRANDFATHER [who is almost 80] have the same recurring nightmare where they think there’s a class they never finished or a class they didn’t know they were enrolled in, and it’s the day of the final but they haven’t ever gone to the class

I’ve had those dreams but about college classes

(via witchbladehost)

awildwomanhowls:

The Morrighan - Celtic Goddess of War and Sovereignity

In Celtic mythology, the Morrighan is known as a goddess of battle and war. However, there’s a bit more to her than this. Also referred to as Morrígu, Morríghan, or Mor-Ríoghain, she is called the “washer at the ford,” because if a warrior saw her washing his armor in the stream, it meant he was to die that day. She is the goddess who determines whether or not you walk off the field of battle, or are carried off upon your shield. In later Irish folklore, this role would be delegated to the bain sidhe, who foresaw the death of members of a specific family or clan.
The Morrighan often appears in the form of a crow or raven, or is seen accompanied by a group of them. In the stories of the Ulster cycle, she is shown as a cow and a wolf as well. The connection with these two animals suggest that in some areas, she may have been connected to fertility and land.
In some legends, the Morrighan is considered a triune, or triple goddess, but there are a lot of inconsistencies to this. She often appears as a sister to the Badb and Macha. In some Neopagan traditions, she is portrayed in her role as destroyer, representing the Crone aspect of the Maiden/Mother/Crone cycle, but this seems to be incorrect when one looks at her original Irish history. Some scholars point out that war specifically is not a primary aspect of the Morrighan, and that her connection to cattle presents her as a goddess of sovereignty. The theory is that she can be seen as a deity who guides or protects a king.
In modern literature, there has been some linking of the Morrighan to the character of Morgan Le Fay in the Arthurian legend. It appears, though, that this is more fanciful thinking than anything else. Although Morgan le Fay appears in the Vita Merlini in the twelfth century, a narrative of the life of Merlin by Geoffrey of Monmouth, it’s unlikely that there’s a connection to the Morrighan. Scholars point out that the name “Morgan” is Welsh, and derived from root words connected to the sea. “Morrighan” is Irish, and is rooted in words that are associated with “terror” or “greatness.” In other words, the names sound similar, but the relationship ends there.
There’s an excellent page with plenty of scholarly information on the Morrighan from Reverend Gwynarion Elessacar at http://www.elessacar.com/the_morrighan.php.

awildwomanhowls:

The Morrighan - Celtic Goddess of War and Sovereignity

In Celtic mythology, the Morrighan is known as a goddess of battle and war. However, there’s a bit more to her than this. Also referred to as Morrígu, Morríghan, or Mor-Ríoghain, she is called the “washer at the ford,” because if a warrior saw her washing his armor in the stream, it meant he was to die that day. She is the goddess who determines whether or not you walk off the field of battle, or are carried off upon your shield. In later Irish folklore, this role would be delegated to the bain sidhe, who foresaw the death of members of a specific family or clan.

The Morrighan often appears in the form of a crow or raven, or is seen accompanied by a group of them. In the stories of the Ulster cycle, she is shown as a cow and a wolf as well. The connection with these two animals suggest that in some areas, she may have been connected to fertility and land.

In some legends, the Morrighan is considered a triune, or triple goddess, but there are a lot of inconsistencies to this. She often appears as a sister to the Badb and Macha. In some Neopagan traditions, she is portrayed in her role as destroyer, representing the Crone aspect of the Maiden/Mother/Crone cycle, but this seems to be incorrect when one looks at her original Irish history. Some scholars point out that war specifically is not a primary aspect of the Morrighan, and that her connection to cattle presents her as a goddess of sovereignty. The theory is that she can be seen as a deity who guides or protects a king.

In modern literature, there has been some linking of the Morrighan to the character of Morgan Le Fay in the Arthurian legend. It appears, though, that this is more fanciful thinking than anything else. Although Morgan le Fay appears in the Vita Merlini in the twelfth century, a narrative of the life of Merlin by Geoffrey of Monmouth, it’s unlikely that there’s a connection to the Morrighan. Scholars point out that the name “Morgan” is Welsh, and derived from root words connected to the sea. “Morrighan” is Irish, and is rooted in words that are associated with “terror” or “greatness.” In other words, the names sound similar, but the relationship ends there.

There’s an excellent page with plenty of scholarly information on the Morrighan from Reverend Gwynarion Elessacar at http://www.elessacar.com/the_morrighan.php.


(via maidenofthestorm)

duggarsandbatesconfessions:

Confession: Michelle’s comment about always being ‘available’ if your husband wants sex is one step short of condoning marital incest. How gross!

What the hell is “marital incest”

duggarsandbatesconfessions:

Confession: Michelle’s comment about always being ‘available’ if your husband wants sex is one step short of condoning marital incest. How gross!

What the hell is “marital incest”

2.08 Crossroad Blues

SASS

(Source: spncapsdaily, via supernaturaldaily)

shadows-of-a-fallen-angel:

anotherscreamingfangirl:

LOOK  AT DEAN’S WRIST-FLIP IN THE FIRST GIF!!!!

DEAN YOUR DIVA IS SHOWING

Sam’s a supermodel

(Source: itsnotdeath, via damagedwinchesters)

dustydreamsanddirtyscars:

queendanneelackles:

Based on this postOriginal Video here

Someone did it! AWESOME!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Duuuuuudeeeeee I’m so creeped out by this. He’s full on sociopath!!

(via green-circles)

Magic is neither good nor evil. It is a tool, like a knife. Is a knife evil? Only if the wielder is evil,
— Hecate, House of Hades (via eruditeborn-amitytransfer)

(via valkyrie-blood)

phoenix-fires:

nymphetgarden:

Namaste means “my soul recognizes yours” not “I tripped really hard at a festival once and now I’m filled with the wisdom of the Earth”

Bless this lol

(via valkyrie-blood)

Alex and I are officially initiated into Reiki 1. #reiki #reiki1

Alex and I are officially initiated into Reiki 1. #reiki #reiki1

You’re either a blessing or a lesson.

You’re either a blessing or a lesson.

(Source: perspective20, via heartspokesperson)

piedrabbit:

mypocketshurt90:

century-child:

Here you go with the feminist shit again. 
You might not care now, but when you want to get some and cannot you’d care.
And sure, it should not be free or whatever, but that doesn’t mean ban. 
What is this: an eye for an eye? That won’t resolve in any way women’s problems



I don’t know what’s funnier - the original joke, or that guy completely missing it.

piedrabbit:

mypocketshurt90:

century-child:

Here you go with the feminist shit again. 

You might not care now, but when you want to get some and cannot you’d care.

And sure, it should not be free or whatever, but that doesn’t mean ban. 

What is this: an eye for an eye? That won’t resolve in any way women’s problems

http://lturofski.webs.com/photos/Toondoo/img1.jpg

I don’t know what’s funnier - the original joke, or that guy completely missing it.

(Source: stinkyjr, via daughterofavalon)

When god became lonely
he created man,
Or was it
When man became lonely
he created god.
— Melanie Exler
(via budddha)

(Source: strengthenizer, via budddha)